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Author Topic: Kids & Money  (Read 5863 times)

Ashley

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Kids & Money
« on: December 13, 2014, 07:53:12 PM »
With so many children coming here for the CR.I.S.P. I thought it would be cool to have a money / saving topic for them.  Here's a few gift ideas:

"Great gifts for kids that instill some financial savvy" - https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/blogs/pay-day-/great-gifts-for-kids-that-instill-some-financial-175630324.html

Chase

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2014, 11:09:13 PM »
With so many children coming here for the CR.I.S.P. I thought it would be cool to have a money / saving topic for them.  Here's a few gift ideas:

"Great gifts for kids that instill some financial savvy" - https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/blogs/pay-day-/great-gifts-for-kids-that-instill-some-financial-175630324.html

What a great idea Ashley, thank you.  Here is a short article on the role grandparents can play in teaching children about money:

"Grandparents, Kids, and Money"

1. Are there things that grandparents can specifically teach kids about money?
Grandparents are great resources for grandchildren when it comes to sharing life stories and advice. Insight from grandparents is an excellent complement to money lessons that parents may already be teaching their kids. One of the most effective ways to communicate sound money lessons is to take advantage of everyday teachable moments. Grandparents often gift money to their grandkids for birthdays or special occasions; these moments provide ideal opportunities to reinforce the concepts of smart saving and the importance of setting financial goals.

Further, stories grandparents often share about their childhood offer a natural way for grandparents to bring up the topic of money. Inflation is one area where grandparents can provide real-life insight. To introduce this topic, grandparents can explain what a gallon of milk cost when they were 10 years old and why the cost has gone up. Second, they can bestow advice on how to prepare for inflation and avoid losing money by discussing the importance of saving, smart investing, and thoughtful asset allocation.

2. Why might a grandparent be a more effective teacher or financial example than a parent?
The most effective teacher is one who can connect with a child and make a lasting impact. A grandparent makes connections in a different way than does a parent. When it comes to teaching children, actions speak louder than words and a grandparent who is a strong financial role model will likely be admired and have their actions emulated by their grandchild.

3. What might grandparents teach kids about the value of saving?
With many years of life experience, grandparents have the advantage of being able to provide lots of "real life" advice to their grandkids. When it comes to saving, grandparents will most likely have saved for something in their life and may have more experiences to share. Grandparents can discuss actual milestones they have saved for, including weddings and vacations, and can share the experience and satisfaction of reaching these savings goals. They can also talk about what they might have done differently (e.g., saved more) in their own lifetime.

In addition, grandparents are often interested in helping fund college education. Planning for college will not only spark discussions with children about saving, but also about smart investing. Grandparents can use this financial goal as a way to introduce different types of investment vehicles available today including stocks and bonds, as well as specialized savings accounts like 529 Plans.

4. What are the three most important money-related tips a grandparent can teach their grandkids?
Always start with a goal. Encouraging grandkids to set realistic goals will help provide real-life incentives and make it easier for them to make smarter spending decisions.
Emphasize prioritization. By teaching grandkids to tie their spending decisions back to their goal, grandparents will be instilling the importance of prioritization. Grandparents can also teach this lesson to children through their own actions by explaining financial decisions they have made in the past—choosing to save for a new home instead of taking an extra vacation, for instance.
Make it fun! By making money lessons enjoyable, grandparents will be more successful in making the lessons stick. One way that grandparents can make money lessons fun is by playing The Great Piggy Bank Adventure® with their grandkids. T. Rowe Price collaborated with Walt Disney Imagineering to produce this free online board game, which conveys basic financial concepts in a way that is fun and easy for kids to understand. Grandparents can also download a free financial education activity book using the link at the top of the screen. With puzzles, games and fun activities, kids will learn basic money lessons—and likely improve their relationship with their grandparents!

https://corporate.troweprice.com/Money-Confident-Kids/Site/Parents/Talking-to-Kids-About-Money-Matters/Grandparents-Kids-and-Money

MiningHabit

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2015, 04:47:33 AM »
Read about this in an Inc article.

https://www.piggybackr.com/

Basically, it's like kickstarter, but for kids. Love the concept, and it seems to be doing quite well.

Shepherd

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2015, 05:22:02 PM »
Read about this in an Inc article.

https://www.piggybackr.com/

Basically, it's like kickstarter, but for kids. Love the concept, and it seems to be doing quite well.

So good to have you back, MiningHabit. Wishing you and your family the best of everything, especially  good health.

Shepherd

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2015, 05:33:18 PM »
Read about this in an Inc article.

https://www.piggybackr.com/

Basically, it's like kickstarter, but for kids. Love the concept, and it seems to be doing quite well.

Crowdfunding is a great thing as long as the regulatory requirements are met. Especially in the crypto world, unfortunately, it has often been ignored and abused. Just be cautious and do your due diligent before investing.

Minty

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2015, 03:05:22 PM »
This is such a cool little write up on savings tips for kids.  It has tips divided into age groups, even as young as 2.  There is also grandparent tips for teaching kids to save.


SAVINGS TIPS
Kids & Money – Preschoolers through Teenagers

http://www.choosetosave.org/tips/index.cfm?fa=display&content_ID=3534

LilyJane

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2015, 12:19:02 PM »
Great idea guys!

I don't have kids yet but when I do they will live their life differently then normal I hope. If they want, i will teach them to be financially self sufficient from the internet from a young age, so they can grow up to be an entrepreneur without wasting their precious time stuck in offline jobs that have dead ends..

Finding a crypto savings plan will be included also!

MissyG

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2015, 05:21:14 PM »
With so many children coming here for the CR.I.S.P. I thought it would be cool to have a money / saving topic for them.  Here's a few gift ideas:

"Great gifts for kids that instill some financial savvy" - https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/blogs/pay-day-/great-gifts-for-kids-that-instill-some-financial-175630324.html

Great idea. I think its time kids became more aware about things like this. If they can learn how to use advanced smartphones at such a young age, im sure they can understand the basics of money management and investment :)

Chase

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2015, 02:36:56 PM »

I came across this article and was thinking about how much a $500 investment in DNotes when a child is born would help when the child is ready for college.


Kids' savings accounts help states create ‘college-going culture’

Free money for college may sound like an easy sell, but when parents of newborns in Maine were offered a $500 grant for their infants’ college education, fewer than half signed up.

Even worse, a study found that less educated, lower-income families — those that could benefit most — were least likely to take the money.

So last year, Maine changed its strategy. Today, each of the roughly 12,500 babies born in Maine each year receives a $500 grant deposited automatically in a college savings account.

...Children who have even small savings accounts for college are seven times more likely to attend and graduate from college than those who have no savings accounts.

Full article - http://tucson.com/ap/washington/kids-savings-accounts-help-states-create-college-going-culture/article_090dce8d-62d3-5904-9b7f-49051d74604c.html

Chase

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2015, 03:45:25 PM »

11 Ways to Teach Kids How to Save Money

1. Use Different Envelopes/Jars
You may be familiar with the envelope budgeting system for your own money, but this can also work for children. On either envelopes or jars, have your child draw pictures of what he or she wants. You may also want to help your child understand that some items will take longer than others to save for.
For example, the short-term savings container might have a picture of a specific toy, while the long-term container might have a picture of a trip to Disneyland. Teach your child to set aside money for short-term and long-term goals, and have another container or envelope for spending on everyday items.

2. Make a Savings Goal Chart
Once you know what your child wants to save for, figure out how many weeks it will take and make a chart. You can represent each week with a box and your child can put a sticker in that box once the money from that week’s allowance is set aside.

3. Offer Rewards for Saving Money
Consider rewarding your child for saving his or her money. Much like my credit union, which offers t-shirts and other prizes, you can offer prizes to your children.
For example, if your child doesn’t spend any money for a certain amount of time, provide a small reward or treat. You can also make the prizes better the longer your child saves. Try stickers, an extra 1/2 hour of video games, toys, or whatever motivates your child.

4. Set a Good Example
One of the best things you can do is let your child see that you save money too. Put money in a jar while your child is watching and tell him or her it’s your savings jar. This will show your child that saving is “normal.” Plus, since most young children want to be like their parents, seeing you do it will provide them with money lessons that further inspire them to save.

5. Match Your Child’s Contributions
A “savings match” can be a great way to encourage your child to save extra money and get an early peek at the benefits of a company match for a retirement savings program like the 401k.


Helping Older Kids Practice Saving

As your child gets older, a goal chart may be less inspiring, and drawing pictures on an envelope tends to lose some of its charm. However, you can still set an example of saving and you can still match your child’s contributions. Plus, it’s always a good idea to have different envelopes, jars, or accounts for different purposes.
As your child grows, here are a few more ideas to teach him or her about saving:

1. Open a High Yield Savings Account
When your child is old enough to understand the concept of interest, you can look for savings accounts that earn interest. Help your child open a high yield account online and explain the importance of compound interest.

2. Help Your Child Prioritize
Have an older child write out a wish list of things he or she wants to spend money on and prioritize that list. Ask your child to think long-term as well. How about a nice laptop for college, a graduation trip to Europe, or even the down payment for a house someday?  Then, have your child allocate an amount of their allowance, or “income,” to each goal. These are the beginnings of a financial plan and this type of thinking will serve your child well in the long run.

3. Let Your Child Make Mistakes
Sometimes the best lesson comes from a poor decision, especially when your child is young and the financial loss won’t be so great.

4. Play Games
There are a number of games available to teach financial concepts to children. Monopoly and The Game of Life, for example, can teach money management skills as well as the importance of planning ahead. Rich Dad Cashflow for Kids is another good option focused on money management.

5. Talk About Money
While you may not want to discuss your salary in front of your children, you may want to let them hear you discuss your financial plan and the arrangements you’re making for retirement, for example. This could simply be having a conversation with your spouse while your children are in the room. In this way, your children can understand that saving is a lifelong endeavor.

 
6. Look for Good Deals with Your Children
One of the keys to saving money is looking for deals on purchases. When my son saw a book he wanted at the grocery store, my husband suggested we go home and look online for a better price. Together, they compared prices on different websites and even considered purchasing the book used.

http://www.moneycrashers.com/teaching-kids-save-money/

Chase

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2015, 01:42:24 AM »

This is a great article for the parents of kids of all ages:


John Hoffmire: Why our children need financial literacy

This article is intended for the parents of the upcoming generation. Alan Greenspan, financial guru and former chairman of the Fed, once said that “the number one problem in today's generation and economy is the lack of financial literacy.” Why is financial literacy so important? Because hard work and long hours can only do so much.

Albert Einstein, possibly the smartest man of the last century, once said: “The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits.” Financial literacy does not require genius, but the depths of the potential hole dug by financial ignorance are limitless, and should provide sufficient motivation for all to learn what we can to become more financially literate. This is especially needed for children as they begin their financial lives.

The sad situation of the young and upcoming generation today is that they start with the greatest intentions and end with outrageous debt. As they begin their adult lives, enrolling at only the best colleges and often forgoing work while in college to dedicate themselves to their studies, they saddle themselves with debt that will follow them for decades. When we combine this debt with a general lack of financial literacy, we arrive at the great personal financial problem of this decade.

When incoming students at four-year colleges were tested on their financial wellness, the average score was around a dismal 30 percent. The test was given to 42,000 college freshmen, and published by Higher One, a financial aid disbursement company, and EverFi, an education technology company. The questions were not about financial ratios or stock call values, but simply tested students’ understanding of student loan terms, credit scores and emergency funds.

While one may assume that college students with proverbially skinny wallets would be very careful with how they spend their money, the survey found that only 39 percent of four-year college students use budgets. Possibly more alarming, 12 percent of students don’t even check their account balances and know how much money they have — because it makes them nervous.

With this situation, it is much more common for students to start to learn financial literacy through an embarrassing rejection of their card at a restaurant on a date, a loan denial when they go to buy their first car, or an intimidating letter that comes in the mail notifying them of their delinquency. While their parents and friends might be forgiving, financial institutions are not, and learning through mistakes in the financial world can leave you in a financial pit of despair for years as significant mistakes will weigh down a credit score for nearly a decade.

But this is not the only way that students can learn.

A much better way is for the older generation to acknowledge its own deficiencies in financial literacy, and lead the younger generation by example — by the example of learning along with them and applying those lessons to their own finances as they help their children do the same. We may have been lucky enough to make it through the gauntlet of financial mistakes and emerge relatively unscathed without sound financial literacy skills, but the gauntlet is much more dangerous now. In just the last 15 years, student loan debt has grown 511 percent. Heading innocently into that financial climate without a better understanding of the tools of financial wellness is likely to end in disaster for the younger generation.

By talking to, and learning about, financial literacy along with children, they can be sent forth into the world, and the older generation toward retirement, on the best footing possible.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865631610/Why-our-children-need-financial-literacy.html?pg=all

MarriedWithChildren

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2015, 02:24:40 AM »
Hi everyone!  I was told to post this here and that everyone would enjoy it.  I thought it was really cute.



Grandfather’s Coins

Every month, Julia and her cousins would go for the big family meal at their grandparents' house. They would always wait excitedly for the moment their grandfather would give them a few coins, "so you can buy yourself something." Then all the children would run off to buy chewing gum, lollies, or wine gums. The grandparents, aunts, uncles, and parents commented that, behaving like this, the children would never learn to manage their money. So they proposed a special test, in which the children would have to show, over the course of a year, just what they could manage to get with those few coins.

Some of the children thought that they would save their money, but Ruben and Nico, the two smallest kids, paid no attention, and they continued spending it all on sweets. Every time, they would show off their sweets in front of the other children, laughing and making fun of their cousins. They made Clara and Joe so angry that these two could no longer stand to keep saving their money. They joined Ruben and Nico in spending whatever they had, as soon as possible, on sweets.

Monty was a clever boy, and he decided to start managing his money by exchanging it: buying and selling things, or betting it with other children, in card games. Soon he had surprised the whole family. He had accumulated a lot of money for little effort. The way he was going, he would end up almost a rich man. However, Monty was not being very careful, and he got involved in more and more risky deals. A few months later he hadn't a single penny left, after placing a losing bet on a horse race.

Alex, on the other hand, had a will of iron. He saved and saved all the money he was given, wanting to win the competition, and at the end of the year he had collected more money than anyone. Even better, with so much money, he managed to buy sweets at a reduced price, so that on the day of the competition he was presented with enough sweets for much more than a year. And even then, he still had enough left over for a toy. He was the clear winner, and the rest of his cousins learnt from him the advantages of knowing how to save and how to wait.

There was also Julia. Poor Julia didn't enjoy the day of the competition, because even though she had had a wonderful secret plan, she had spent her money without giving her plan enough time to work. However, she was so sure that her plan was a good one, that she decided to carry on with it, and maybe change the expressions on her relatives' faces, who had seemed to be saying "What a disaster that girl is. She couldn't manage to save anything."

When she was about to complete the second year of her plan, Julia surprised everyone by turning up at the grandparents' house with a violin and a lot of money. What was even more impressive was hearing her play. She did it really well.

Everyone knew that Julia adored the violin, even though the family couldn't afford to pay for her to have lessons. So Julia had got to know a poor violinist who played in the park, and she offered him all the coins her grandfather had given her, if he would teach her how to play. Although it wasn't much money, on seeing Julia's excitement, the violinist agreed, and he taught her happily for months. Julia showed so much desire and interest that a little after a year the violinist loaned her a violin so they could play together in the park, as a duo. They were so successful that gradually she managed to buy her own violin, with quite a bit of money to spare.

From then on, the whole family helped her, and she became a very famous violinist.
And she would always tell people how it was possible, with just a few coins well spent, to make your wildest dreams a reality.


There are lot's of kid's stories here: http://freestoriesforkids.com/children/stories-and-tales/grandfather%27s-coins
« Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 02:26:57 AM by MarriedWithChildren »

Shepherd

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2015, 04:53:25 AM »
Hi everyone!  I was told to post this here and that everyone would enjoy it.  I thought it was really cute.



Grandfather’s Coins

Every month, Julia and her cousins would go for the big family meal at their grandparents' house. They would always wait excitedly for the moment their grandfather would give them a few coins, "so you can buy yourself something." Then all the children would run off to buy chewing gum, lollies, or wine gums. The grandparents, aunts, uncles, and parents commented that, behaving like this, the children would never learn to manage their money. So they proposed a special test, in which the children would have to show, over the course of a year, just what they could manage to get with those few coins.

Some of the children thought that they would save their money, but Ruben and Nico, the two smallest kids, paid no attention, and they continued spending it all on sweets. Every time, they would show off their sweets in front of the other children, laughing and making fun of their cousins. They made Clara and Joe so angry that these two could no longer stand to keep saving their money. They joined Ruben and Nico in spending whatever they had, as soon as possible, on sweets.

Monty was a clever boy, and he decided to start managing his money by exchanging it: buying and selling things, or betting it with other children, in card games. Soon he had surprised the whole family. He had accumulated a lot of money for little effort. The way he was going, he would end up almost a rich man. However, Monty was not being very careful, and he got involved in more and more risky deals. A few months later he hadn't a single penny left, after placing a losing bet on a horse race.

Alex, on the other hand, had a will of iron. He saved and saved all the money he was given, wanting to win the competition, and at the end of the year he had collected more money than anyone. Even better, with so much money, he managed to buy sweets at a reduced price, so that on the day of the competition he was presented with enough sweets for much more than a year. And even then, he still had enough left over for a toy. He was the clear winner, and the rest of his cousins learnt from him the advantages of knowing how to save and how to wait.

There was also Julia. Poor Julia didn't enjoy the day of the competition, because even though she had had a wonderful secret plan, she had spent her money without giving her plan enough time to work. However, she was so sure that her plan was a good one, that she decided to carry on with it, and maybe change the expressions on her relatives' faces, who had seemed to be saying "What a disaster that girl is. She couldn't manage to save anything."

When she was about to complete the second year of her plan, Julia surprised everyone by turning up at the grandparents' house with a violin and a lot of money. What was even more impressive was hearing her play. She did it really well.

Everyone knew that Julia adored the violin, even though the family couldn't afford to pay for her to have lessons. So Julia had got to know a poor violinist who played in the park, and she offered him all the coins her grandfather had given her, if he would teach her how to play. Although it wasn't much money, on seeing Julia's excitement, the violinist agreed, and he taught her happily for months. Julia showed so much desire and interest that a little after a year the violinist loaned her a violin so they could play together in the park, as a duo. They were so successful that gradually she managed to buy her own violin, with quite a bit of money to spare.

From then on, the whole family helped her, and she became a very famous violinist.
And she would always tell people how it was possible, with just a few coins well spent, to make your wildest dreams a reality.


There are lot's of kid's stories here: http://freestoriesforkids.com/children/stories-and-tales/grandfather%27s-coins

Thanks. What a great story. I totally enjoyed it.

Chase

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2015, 04:09:38 PM »
Hi everyone!  I was told to post this here and that everyone would enjoy it.  I thought it was really cute.



Grandfather’s Coins

Every month, Julia and her cousins would go for the big family meal at their grandparents' house. They would always wait excitedly for the moment their grandfather would give them a few coins, "so you can buy yourself something." Then all the children would run off to buy chewing gum, lollies, or wine gums. The grandparents, aunts, uncles, and parents commented that, behaving like this, the children would never learn to manage their money. So they proposed a special test, in which the children would have to show, over the course of a year, just what they could manage to get with those few coins.

Some of the children thought that they would save their money, but Ruben and Nico, the two smallest kids, paid no attention, and they continued spending it all on sweets. Every time, they would show off their sweets in front of the other children, laughing and making fun of their cousins. They made Clara and Joe so angry that these two could no longer stand to keep saving their money. They joined Ruben and Nico in spending whatever they had, as soon as possible, on sweets.

Monty was a clever boy, and he decided to start managing his money by exchanging it: buying and selling things, or betting it with other children, in card games. Soon he had surprised the whole family. He had accumulated a lot of money for little effort. The way he was going, he would end up almost a rich man. However, Monty was not being very careful, and he got involved in more and more risky deals. A few months later he hadn't a single penny left, after placing a losing bet on a horse race.

Alex, on the other hand, had a will of iron. He saved and saved all the money he was given, wanting to win the competition, and at the end of the year he had collected more money than anyone. Even better, with so much money, he managed to buy sweets at a reduced price, so that on the day of the competition he was presented with enough sweets for much more than a year. And even then, he still had enough left over for a toy. He was the clear winner, and the rest of his cousins learnt from him the advantages of knowing how to save and how to wait.

There was also Julia. Poor Julia didn't enjoy the day of the competition, because even though she had had a wonderful secret plan, she had spent her money without giving her plan enough time to work. However, she was so sure that her plan was a good one, that she decided to carry on with it, and maybe change the expressions on her relatives' faces, who had seemed to be saying "What a disaster that girl is. She couldn't manage to save anything."

When she was about to complete the second year of her plan, Julia surprised everyone by turning up at the grandparents' house with a violin and a lot of money. What was even more impressive was hearing her play. She did it really well.

Everyone knew that Julia adored the violin, even though the family couldn't afford to pay for her to have lessons. So Julia had got to know a poor violinist who played in the park, and she offered him all the coins her grandfather had given her, if he would teach her how to play. Although it wasn't much money, on seeing Julia's excitement, the violinist agreed, and he taught her happily for months. Julia showed so much desire and interest that a little after a year the violinist loaned her a violin so they could play together in the park, as a duo. They were so successful that gradually she managed to buy her own violin, with quite a bit of money to spare.

From then on, the whole family helped her, and she became a very famous violinist.
And she would always tell people how it was possible, with just a few coins well spent, to make your wildest dreams a reality.


There are lot's of kid's stories here: http://freestoriesforkids.com/children/stories-and-tales/grandfather%27s-coins

Thanks. What a great story. I totally enjoyed it.



It's perfect here and I loved it!  Thanks MWC!  :)

Minty

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Re: Kids & Money
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2015, 07:32:54 PM »
Hi everyone!  I was told to post this here and that everyone would enjoy it.  I thought it was really cute.



Grandfather’s Coins

Every month, Julia and her cousins would go for the big family meal at their grandparents' house. They would always wait excitedly for the moment their grandfather would give them a few coins, "so you can buy yourself something." Then all the children would run off to buy chewing gum, lollies, or wine gums. The grandparents, aunts, uncles, and parents commented that, behaving like this, the children would never learn to manage their money. So they proposed a special test, in which the children would have to show, over the course of a year, just what they could manage to get with those few coins.

Some of the children thought that they would save their money, but Ruben and Nico, the two smallest kids, paid no attention, and they continued spending it all on sweets. Every time, they would show off their sweets in front of the other children, laughing and making fun of their cousins. They made Clara and Joe so angry that these two could no longer stand to keep saving their money. They joined Ruben and Nico in spending whatever they had, as soon as possible, on sweets.

Monty was a clever boy, and he decided to start managing his money by exchanging it: buying and selling things, or betting it with other children, in card games. Soon he had surprised the whole family. He had accumulated a lot of money for little effort. The way he was going, he would end up almost a rich man. However, Monty was not being very careful, and he got involved in more and more risky deals. A few months later he hadn't a single penny left, after placing a losing bet on a horse race.

Alex, on the other hand, had a will of iron. He saved and saved all the money he was given, wanting to win the competition, and at the end of the year he had collected more money than anyone. Even better, with so much money, he managed to buy sweets at a reduced price, so that on the day of the competition he was presented with enough sweets for much more than a year. And even then, he still had enough left over for a toy. He was the clear winner, and the rest of his cousins learnt from him the advantages of knowing how to save and how to wait.

There was also Julia. Poor Julia didn't enjoy the day of the competition, because even though she had had a wonderful secret plan, she had spent her money without giving her plan enough time to work. However, she was so sure that her plan was a good one, that she decided to carry on with it, and maybe change the expressions on her relatives' faces, who had seemed to be saying "What a disaster that girl is. She couldn't manage to save anything."

When she was about to complete the second year of her plan, Julia surprised everyone by turning up at the grandparents' house with a violin and a lot of money. What was even more impressive was hearing her play. She did it really well.

Everyone knew that Julia adored the violin, even though the family couldn't afford to pay for her to have lessons. So Julia had got to know a poor violinist who played in the park, and she offered him all the coins her grandfather had given her, if he would teach her how to play. Although it wasn't much money, on seeing Julia's excitement, the violinist agreed, and he taught her happily for months. Julia showed so much desire and interest that a little after a year the violinist loaned her a violin so they could play together in the park, as a duo. They were so successful that gradually she managed to buy her own violin, with quite a bit of money to spare.

From then on, the whole family helped her, and she became a very famous violinist.
And she would always tell people how it was possible, with just a few coins well spent, to make your wildest dreams a reality.


There are lot's of kid's stories here: http://freestoriesforkids.com/children/stories-and-tales/grandfather%27s-coins

Thanks. What a great story. I totally enjoyed it.



It's perfect here and I loved it!  Thanks MWC!  :)


I just found this and I love it too!!  I'm passing on my email train.  ;D


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